A MASSACRE OF CONVENIENCE: Democracy, progress, and the disappearance of a People in the Ecuadorian Amazon

8th February

“While the heavily-armed Waorani scoured the jungle to exterminate the uncontacted Taromenane tribe, leading Ecuadorian officials were in Beijing soliciting bids for new petrol concessions in its Amazon.” writes the Welsh journalist Robin Llewellyn who investigates the complicity of the Ecuadorian government in the massacres of uncontacted tribes above the oil rich Yasuni Amazon Rainforest.



Viva Rocinha and the Rise of Citizen Journalism in Rio de Janeiros Favelas

20th May

It’s in disenfranchised communities around the world where citizen journalism over social media is empowering everyday people to write the news and nowhere is this more evident than in Rio de Janeiro.

For this interview we talked with Michel Silva who founded the citizen journalism platform Viva Rocinha when he was 18 years old. Today with a month left before the World Cup kickoff we talk about how smartphones and community media platforms like Viva Rocinha help strengthen and protect a community.



A Hidden Tragedy Translated: The Censored Book That Broke Ecuador’s Heart

26th February

“At the end of march this year, 2013, in the jungles of Ecuador’s northern orient, a great massacre of uncontacted indigenous was committed.” opens the book A Hidden Tragedy. “Accomplished in a way that was abusive and cruel. Those eliminated, above all, where women and children.”

Seventeen minutes before the book was due to be presented to the Ecuadorian public it was censored from circulation “over any medium” by none other than Judge Hilda Garces of the Judicial Unit of Violence Against Women and Family



A Massacre, An Oil Multinational and Chief Ompore’s Last Smile

8th January

Chief Ompore couldn’t stop smiling as he watched photos of Amazonian animals get projected across the Town Hall wall of Yarentaro – a remote village in Ecuador’s Yasuní National Park inside what oil companies call “Block 16.”

It was the 14th of December 2012 and the Spanish oil giant RepSol that administers the petroleum block had funded a project as part of its Biodiversity Conservation and Sustainable Development Strategy “designed to alleviate pressure on the forest and to restore the ecosystem to its original state.”

RepSol’s project to offset the hundreds of millions of dollars of crude oil being pumped out of Block 16 was to build a “zoo-creidero” or animal hatchery. Since big oil moved in bushmeant had become increasingly scarce in the Waorani tribe’s formerly bountiful hunting grounds but once the zoo-creidero was completed those same wild animals getting … Read More »



Oil & Genocide: Why We Must Protect the Human Rights of Uncontacted Tribes in Ecuador’s Yasuní

21st November

As the Ecuadorian government begins drilling for oil in the Yasuni National Park – one of the most biodiverse regions on Planet Earth – human rights lawyer Luis Xavier Solis discusses the existential threat of genocide facing the uncontacted tribes that inhabit this UNESCO World Biosphere Reserve.



FALSE POSITIVE: The Punk Rock Musician on Dialysis That Colombian Police Cant Silence

29th October

When Colombian police discovered a military grenade on terminally ill Punk Rock musician Luís Alberto Velásquez Molina he was sent to prison.

Many of the Medellin’s punk rockers however believe there’s something very fishy about the police version of events and took to social networks to tell the world about False Positives – a practice endemic inside Colombia’s armed forces where innocent civilians are framed so police and military can collect commissions.