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anton

anton has 18 articles published.

Viva Rocinha and the Rise of Citizen Journalism in Rio de Janeiros Favelas

in Citizen Journalism/Guerilla Journalism/Interviews by

It’s in disenfranchised communities around the world where citizen journalism over social media is empowering everyday people to write the news and nowhere is this more evident than in Rio de Janeiro.

For this interview we talked with Michel Silva who founded the citizen journalism platform Viva Rocinha when he was 18 years old. Today with a month left before the World Cup kickoff we talk about how smartphones and community media platforms like Viva Rocinha help strengthen and protect a community.

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A Hidden Tragedy Translated: The Censored Book That Broke Ecuador’s Heart

in Corruption & Transparency/Environmental Activism/Human Rights by
Ecuador Censored Book

“At the end of march this year, 2013, in the jungles of Ecuador’s northern orient, a great massacre of uncontacted indigenous was committed.” opens the book A Hidden Tragedy. “Accomplished in a way that was abusive and cruel. Those eliminated, above all, where women and children.”

Seventeen minutes before the book was due to be presented to the Ecuadorian public it was censored from circulation “over any medium” by none other than Judge Hilda Garces of the Judicial Unit of Violence Against Women and Family

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A Massacre, An Oil Multinational and Chief Ompore’s Last Smile

in Citizen Journalism/Food & Water Security/Human Rights by
ecuador oil

Chief Ompore couldn’t stop smiling as he watched photos of Amazonian animals get projected across the Town Hall wall of Yarentaro – a remote village in Ecuador’s Yasuní National Park inside what oil companies call “Block 16.” It was the 14th of December 2012 and the Spanish oil giant RepSol that administers the petroleum block had funded a project as part of its Biodiversity Conservation and Sustainable Development Strategy “designed to alleviate pressure on the forest and to restore the ecosystem to its original state.” RepSol’s project to offset the hundreds of millions of dollars of crude oil being pumped out of Block 16 was to build a “zoo-creidero” or animal hatchery. Since big oil moved in bushmeant had become increasingly scarce in the Waorani tribe’s formerly bountiful hunting grounds but once the zoo-creidero was completed those same wild animals getting projected against the wall could be bred for food in captivity. On the 5th of March 2013, less than three months after these photos were taken, Ompore Omeway was murdered. His body and that of his wife Buganey were found impaled with spears inside RepSol’s Block 16 and the prime suspects were an uncontacted Amazonian tribe inside the Yasuní National Park called the Taromenane. Before the month of March ended an estimated 30 men, women and children of the Taromenane tribe were massacred in a battle that pitched wooden spears against modern weaponry. Two Taromenane girls, aged 3 and 6, were kidnapped by those that killed their tribe while members of the Ecuadorian government spent seven months downplaying the massacre. Some even casted doubt on whether the Taromenane still exist. This uncontacted tribe that is now fighting for survival against genocide live on lands that hold an estimated 846 million barrels of crude oil. Amazon Oil Highways & Illegal…

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Oil & Genocide: Why We Must Protect the Human Rights of Uncontacted Tribes in Ecuador’s Yasuní

in Citizen Journalism/Environmental Activism/Human Rights by

As the Ecuadorian government begins drilling for oil in the Yasuni National Park – one of the most biodiverse regions on Planet Earth – human rights lawyer Luis Xavier Solis discusses the existential threat of genocide facing the uncontacted tribes that inhabit this UNESCO World Biosphere Reserve.

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Petróleo y el Genocidio: Yasuní y los Derechos Humanos de Pueblos Indígenas Aislados

in Derechos Humanos/Periodismo Ciudadano/Periodismo Guerrillero by

Lo que tienen en común todas las nacionalidades y los pueblos en aislamiento constreñido o voluntario es que son pueblos indígenas, y por lo tanto se les debe tratar como tales, asumir su existencia, y tener en cuenta en toda política que tenga que ver con sus derechos, territorio, medio ambiente, pero con mayor atención por su situación especial. – escriba Luis Xavier Solis Tenesaca, un abogado de derechos humanos

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FALSE POSITIVE: The Punk Rock Musician on Dialysis That Colombian Police Cant Silence

in Citizen Journalism/Corruption & Transparency/Guerilla Journalism by

When Colombian police discovered a military grenade on terminally ill Punk Rock musician Luís Alberto Velásquez Molina he was sent to prison.

Many of the Medellin’s punk rockers however believe there’s something very fishy about the police version of events and took to social networks to tell the world about False Positives – a practice endemic inside Colombia’s armed forces where innocent civilians are framed so police and military can collect commissions.

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How Boyaca’s Farmers Sparked a Movement that Brought the Colombian Government to its Knees

in Citizen Journalism/Food & Water Security/Guerilla Journalism by

Its not every Sunday that the priest of a rural Colombian city called Tunja begins his sermon with a story of an illiterate Indian girl who grew up in the shadow of the British Empire.

The 8th of September was not a normal Sunday.

For the three weeks previous farmers from the province of Boyaca and its capital Tunja had blocked the roads to strangle the food supply en route to Colombia’s biggest city Bogota.

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Media Manipulation 102: The Viral Images That Shook Colombia’s Social Networks

in Guerilla Journalism by

On Colombia’s largest TV news source Caracol there is a segment called ASI SE MUEVE LOS REDES or THIS IS HOW NETWORKS MOVE which parades tweets that are trending and memes making rounds around social networks.

During the national agrarian strikes that engulfed the country this segment became a tool to whitewash what was really moving on social networks and manufacture consent to conform with claims deliberately belittling the size of the protests.

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Media Manipulation 101: The Injured Youth and the Rise of Citizen Journalism in Colombia

in Citizen Journalism/Guerilla Journalism by

Chekhovs Kalashnikov looks at why one of the most viral videos of the national agrarian strikes in Colombia, that of an anonymous youth known as the “Joven Herido,” was whitewashed by major networks but identified thanks to the tireless work of citizen journalists.

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